New Edition of Airplane Flying Handbook

FAA has published a new edition of the Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3B), the handbook that complements the Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge and the Airman Certification Standards (and Practical Test Standards).

airplaneflyinghandbook-cover

The preface notes that:

The Airplane Flying Handbook provides basic knowledge that is essential for pilots. This handbook introduces basic pilot skills and knowledge that are essential for piloting airplanes. It provides information on transition to other airplanes and the operation of various airplane systems…This handbook is developed to assist student pilots learning to fly airplanes. It is also beneficial to pilots who wish to improve their flying proficiency and aeronautical knowledge, those pilots preparing for additional certificates or ratings, and flight instructors engaged in the instruction of both student certificated pilots. It introduces the future pilot to the realm of flight and provides information and guidance in the performance of procedures and maneuvers required for pilot certification.

 

ForeFlight Plugin for FSX, Prepar3D

Flight1 Aviation Technologies, a major add-on developer for the Microsoft Flight Simulator series, is offering a free plugin for FSX and Prepar3D. Details and download information here.

Our ForeFlight Plug-in sends GPS, AHRS, and Traffic data from Lockheed Martin® Prepar3D™ or Microsoft® Flight Simulator X to ForeFlight on your iPad or iPhone.

ForeFlight uses that data just as it would use data coming from a real GPS or ADS-B device. You can use ForeFlight with the simulator just like you would in an airplane, including the GPS, ADS-B Traffic, and Attitude Indicator features.

According to Flight1:

Once the connection is made, you’ll be able to:

  • Practice using ForeFlight while you’re aviating, navigating, and communicating within the simulated world.
  • Master using ForeFlight during VFR and IFR flights between any airports anywhere in the world, in any season, in any weather conditions, at any time of day or night.
  • Learn to use ForeFlight features you might never have the opportunity to explore during a real flight in a real airplane.
  • Build proficiency flying unfamiliar routes and procedures by “pre-flying” them using the flight simulation and ForeFlight.
  • Practice using ForeFlight to perform route modifications and other potentially distracting tasks.
  • Train using scenarios you could otherwise only complete in a real airplane (or via “chair flying” using your imagination).

ATC Telephone Numbers for IFR Clearances

The FAA has announced that it will publish telephone numbers for some ATC facilities that provide IFR clearances and cancellations of IFR flight plans via the phone in the Chart Supplement (formerly known as the A/FD). FAA planned to begin implementation of the change on October 1, 2016 and complete the process by June 30, 2017.

The basic information was provided in a recommendation document (ACF-CG RD 16-020309) at the Aeronautical Charting Forum, which reads in part:

Subject: Publication of approach control phone numbers for purposes of Clearance
Delivery and/or IFR flight plan cancellation.

Background/Discussion: In accordance with the Administrator’s NAS Efficient Streamlined Services Initiative Air Traffic, Flight Service, and NATCA have agreed that air traffic facilities currently providing clearances to pilots via telephone (informally) will have their numbers published in the appropriate Chart Supplement, US. These same facilities will have the option to have a separate phone line installed for IFR flight plan cancellations, which will also be published. The attached Policy Decision Memorandum identifies the affected 32 Air Traffic facilities and reflects approval by VP System Operations, VP Air Traffic Services, and VP Technical Operations. Also attached are the Scoping Document Workgroup Agreement, Safety Risk Management Document, and Implementation Plan.

Recommendations: Publish the approach control phone numbers for Clearance Delivery and/or IFR flight plan cancellation in the Chart Supplement US, for example:

For CLNC DEL CTC BOSTON APCH (603) 594-5551

And, when available, for those facilities with the IFR cancellation line

To CANCEL IFR CTC BOSTON APCH (603) 594-5552

The official FAA memoranda that describe the details are attached to the recommendation documented linked above.

The list of TRACONs and towers (subject to revision) that will issue clearances directly to pilots via telephone includes:

  1. A90 -Boston
  2. C90 – Chicago
  3. Dl O -Dallas-Fort Worth
  4. D21 – Detroit
  5. F 11 – Central Florida
  6. 190 – Houston
  7. L30 – Las Vegas
  8. M03 – Memphis
  9. N90 -New York
  10. NCT -Northem California
  11. P80 – Portland
  12. R90 – Omaha
  13. S46 – Seattle
  14. S56 – Salt Lake
  15. T75 – Louis
  16. U90 -Tucson
  17. Y90 – Yankee
  18. ABE – Allentown, PA
  19. AUS -Austin, TX
  20. AVP – Scranton, PA
  21. ENA -Nashville, TN
  22. CLT – Charlotte,NC
  23. CRP – Corpus Christie, TX
  24. DAB -Daytona, FL
  25. IND – Indianapolis, IN
  26. MCI -Kansas City, MO
  27. MDT -Harrisburg, PA
  28. MSY -New Orleans, LA
  29. ORF -Norfolk, VA
  30. PHL – Philadelphia, PA
  31. SAT – San Antonia, TX
  32. PCT – Potomac, VA

New Edition of AC 00-6 Aviation Weather

FAA has published a new edition of AC 00-6 – Aviation Weather (PDF), the 1975 handbook that explains weather theory for pilots.

New scientific capabilities now necessitate an update to this AC. In 1975, aviation users were not directly touched by radar and satellite weather. In 2016, much of what airmen understand about the current atmosphere comes from these important data sources. This AC is intended to provide basic weather information that all airmen must know. This document is intended to be used as a resource for pilot and dispatcher training programs.

The new edition of the companion handbook, AC 00-45 Aviation Weather Services, which explains aviation weather reports and forecasts and the briefings available to pilots, is also available at the FAA website.

Simulated Wake-Turbulence Encounter

I do the exercise below with my stall/spin/upset students to simulate the disorienting effect of a wake-turbulence encounter. We perform 1-1/2 aileron rolls to inverted and then push and roll to recover to normal upright flight. The exercise is confusing at first, and the nose always drops well below the horizon during the “upset.” It’s a great way to help pilots understand what could happen if they were caught in a wintip vortex.

Wake turbulence caused by wingtip vortices is major hazard to small aircraft.

WakeTurbulence

The wingtip vortices are a by-product of lift. You can find detailed information about wake turbulence in FAA Advisory Circular AC 90-23 and in the Aeronautical Information Manual (Chapter 7, Safety of Flight; Section 3, Wake Turbulence).

 

 

 

FAA Releases List of VORs to be Shut Down

FAA has published a list of 308 VORs that it plans to shut down in phases by 2025. The notice in the Federal Register appeared on July 26, 2016. The notice includes a list of VORs that the FAA wants to decommission.

This document provides the discontinuance selection criteria and candidate list of VOR Navigational Aids (NAVAIDs) targeted for discontinuance as part of the VOR MON Implementation Program and United States (U.S.) National Airspace System (NAS) Efficient Streamline Services Initiative. Additionally, this policy addresses the regulatory processes the FAA plans to follow to discontinue VORs.

For background on the FAA’s plans, see Latest Info on VOR Shutdowns here at BruceAir. Note that under this plan, only about one-third of the existing network of VORs will be decommissioned.

According to the FAA notice:

The following criteria were used by the FAA to determine which VORs would be retained as a part of the MON:

— Retain VORs to perform Instrument Landing System (ILS), Localizer (LOC), or VOR approaches supporting MON airports at suitable destinations within 100 NM of any location within the CONUS. Selected approaches would not require Automatic Direction Finder (ADF), Distance Measuring Equipment (DME), Radar, or GPS.Show citation box

— Retain VORs to support international oceanic arrival routes.

— Retain VORs to provide coverage at and above 5,000 ft AGL.

— Retain most VORs in the Western U.S. Mountainous Area (WUSMA), specifically those anchoring Victor airways through high elevation terrain.

— Retain VORs required for military use.

— VORs outside of the CONUS were not considered for discontinuance under the VOR MON Implementation Program.

The following considerations were used to supplement the VOR MON criteria above:

— Only FAA owned/operated VORs were considered for discontinuance.

— Co-located DME and Tactical Air Navigation (TACAN) systems will generally be retained when the VOR service is terminated.

— Co-located communication services relocated or reconfigured to continue transmitting their services.

According to the FAA notice:

The FAA remains committed to the plan to retain an optimized network of VOR NAVAIDs. The MON will enable pilots to revert from Performance Based Navigation (PBN) to conventional navigation for approach, terminal and en route operations in the event of a GPS outage…

The VOR MON is designed to enable aircraft, having lost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) service, to revert to conventional navigation procedures. The VOR MON is further designed to allow aircraft to proceed to a MON airport where an ILS or VOR approach procedure can be flown without the necessity of GPS, DME, ADF, or Surveillance. Of course, any airport with a suitable instrument approach may be used for landing, but the VOR MON assures that at least one airport will be within 100 NM.

FAA Updates Two Handbooks

FAA has released updated editions of two key handbooks for pilots and flight instructors.
The new version of Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-25B) is a key reference for pilots training for the private pilot, commercial pilot, and flight instructor certificates.

You can find free PDFs of these handbooks and other FAA training manuals on the FAA website here and here.

PHAKCover

The Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge provides basic knowledge that is essential for pilots. This handbook introduces pilots to the broad spectrum of knowledge that will be needed as they progress in their pilot training. Except for the Code of Federal Regulations pertinent to civil aviation, most of the knowledge areas applicable to pilot certification are presented. This handbook is useful to beginning pilots, as well as those pursuing more advanced pilot certificates.

The Weight & Balance Handbook (FAA-H-8083-1B) is aimed at pilots and maintenance technicians.

Weight-Balance-Cover

The Aircraft Weight and Balance Handbook has been prepared in recognition of the importance of weight and balance technology in conducting safe and efficient flight. The objective of this handbook is twofold: to provide the airframe and powerplant mechanic (A&P) with the method of determining the empty weight and empty weight center of gravity (EWCG) of an aircraft and to furnish the flight crew with information on loading and operating the aircraft to ensure its weight is within the allowable limit and the center of gravity (CG) is within the allowable range.

You can find free PDFs of these handbooks and other FAA training manuals on the FAA website here and here.