An ILS at Night

Clear skies recently offered an opportunity to log a little night flying time and to practice an ILS at Boeing Field (KBFI). I can’t log the approach for IFR currency (I wasn’t under the hood and didn’t have a safety pilot), but it’s still good practice to fly approaches in VMC when possible to reinforce IFR procedures.

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Videos: A Couple of Instrument Approaches

I took my A36 Bonanza out for some instrument practice. Here are a couple of longish videos, with ATC, that show the RNAV (GPS) RWY 20 approach at Bremerton National (KPWT) and the ILS RWY 14R at Boeing Field (KBFI).

The aircraft is equipped with a Garmin G500 PFD/MFD and GTN 750 WAAS navigator. I use ForeFlight on an iPad Mini 5 for flight planning, charts, ADS-B weather (FIS-B) and traffic (TIS-B). A good source of information about using tablets in the cockpit is iPad Pilot News.

You can find the videos on my YouTube channel, BruceAirFlying, or watch them via the direct links below.

An RNAV Approach at Walla Walla

Here’s video of the RNAV (GPS) RWY 20 approach at Walla Walla, WA (KALW). Because my A36 Bonanza is equipped with WAAS-capable Garmin GTN 750, I can fly to the ILS-like LPV (localizer performance with vertical guidance) minimums. Given the choice between an ILS and an RNAV procedure with LPV minimums, I usually choose the RNAV approach. It’s easier to set up with no CDI switching required.

An IFR Flight: KBFI-KUAO

Here’s video from a recent IFR flight in the Bonanza from Boeing Field (KBFI) in Seattle, WA to Aurora, OR (KUAO) just south of Portland, OR.

I was in visual meterological conditions (VMC) for almost all of the trip, but the destination was shrouded in low fog when I departed Seattle. I arrived just as the mist was clearing.

I flew the NRVNA ONE departure procedure from KBFI and flew via the preferred low-altitude IFR route to the Portland area (OLM V165 UBG). At KUAO, I flew the RNAV RWY 35 approach, which provides LPV minimums for WAAS-capable aircraft like my A36, which is equipped with a Garmin GTN 750 navigator and G500 PFD/MFD. (To experiment with these avionics, you can download the free Garmin simulators for Windows.)

I also use the free Beechcraft Performance app for iOS to confirm takeoff and landing data and other important details.

Throughout this 20-minute video, I tried to verbalize my intentions, procedures, checklists to help you understand how I try to conduct a flight.

Aerobatics with Data

Here’s a look at an aerobatic ride with data from a Garmin VIRB Ultra 30 camera’s sensors overlaid. The GPS-based position, speed, and altitude don’t match the information from cockpit instruments precisely, and the sensors sometimes can’t keep up with the dynamics of aerobatics, but the data do give you an idea of how quickly things change during aerobatics. We also had a tailwind of about 6 knots during the landing, so the GPS-derived groundspeed is higher than the indicated airspeed during the approach and landing.

It’s also worth noting that during aerobatic rides I try to fly smoothly and keep the Gs under control. Rides aren’t aerobatic contests or airshows.

To display the data in a video, I first import the video and corresponding data into the free Garmin VIRB Edit program. After choosing the gauges to display, I export the video and do the final editing in Adobe Premiere Elements.

Aerobatic Ride on a Summer Morning

New Private Pilot, IFR, and Commercial ACS effective June 11, 2018

FAA has published new editions of the Airmen Certification Standards for the:

  • Private Pilot-Airplane
  • Commercial Pilot-Airplane
  • Instrument Rating-Airplane

The new ACS are effective June 11, 2018. The introductory material for each ACS document includes a summary of major changes. You can download free PDF editions of the new ACS from the FAA website.

A couple of items on the commercial pilot ACS are worth pointing out here:

  • Revised Area of Operation IV to require touch down at a proper pitch attitude.
  • Added the evaluator’s discretion to ask for a full stall in Area of Operation VII, Tasks B and C.

The descriptions for the approach stall now state:

  • Acknowledge the cues at the first indication of a stall (e.g., airplane buffet, stall horn, etc.).
  • Recover at the first indication of a stall or after a full stall has occurred, as specified by the evaluator.

The discussion of the landing task notes:

Touch down at a proper pitch attitude, within 200 feet beyond or on the specified point, with no side drift, and with the airplane’s longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway center/landing path.