Video: Night ILS at KBFI

I enjoyed views of the Seattle skyline yesterday evening during an ILS RWY 14R approach to Boeing Field (KBFI) in the Beechcraft A36 Bonanza.

More aviation videos at my YouTube channel, here.

Lincoln Departure at KBFI

Air traffic control has revised the Lincoln Departure at Boeing Field (KBFI) in Seattle. It’s one of the VFR procedures used at to provide an orderly flow of traffic below the Seattle Class B airspace and to avoid TCAS alerts in airliners descending over KBFI into KSEA.

The Lincoln Departure almost always begins from runway 14R. It now requires a climb straight ahead to 800 ft., then a level 180-degree turn into a close-in right downwind over the Duwamish River, remaining at 800 ft. As you approach the South Park Bridge, almost abeam the control tower, turn left toward a school bus parking lot and parallel the main streets that head west over the ridge. As you reach the ridge, climb no higher than 1000 ft. Continue on a track between the north tip of Vashon Island and Blake Island. When you cross the SEA 323 degree radial, you can climb to 1500 ft. At the shoreline, you can continue to 2500 ft.

Seattle Scenery

On a short flight from Arlington, WA (KAWO) back to Boeing Field (KBFI) in Seattle, I enjoyed views of Puget Sound and downtown Seattle. Here are some video highlights.

Beautiful Day to Fly in Seattle

Here are some excerpts from an aerobatic flight with a German 747 captain who is also an active light aircraft pilot. We explored basic aerobatics on a beautiful late-summer day in Seattle.

An Aerobatic Ride near Seattle

Here’s another video that shows a typical aerobatic ride on a beautiful day in Seattle. We’re in the Extra 300L. The maneuvers include aileron rolls, loops, half-Cuban 8s, hammerheads, point rolls, slow rolls, vertical rolls, and inverted flight. The video also shows a typical approach and landing in the Extra 300L.

Aerobatics—As Seen from Seat 1A

The aerobatics season in Seattle has returned, and Tuesday I gave an aerobatic ride. It was gorgeous day.

I set up a GoPro to look out at the left wing to capture the scenery as I demoed a series of basic maneuvers. This is the view you’d have from a window seat on an airliner–if airliners did aerobatics.

Enjoy the ride. More at my YouTube channel, BruceAirFlying.

An aerobatic ride in the Extra 300L near Seattle.

Aerobatic Ride with Cockpit Audio

I gave an aerobatic ride out of KBFI yesterday in Seattle to one of the Seafair boosters.

It was a spectacular day to fly, and this hop gave me a chance to test a cable/adapter that feeds cockpit audio to my GoPro. (As you’ll see, my passenger brought his own GoPro.) The cable should work with any device that has a 3.5mm audio input, making it a handy accessory if you want to record cockpit audio.

If you use a GoPro, you may want to get the “skeleton housing,” which has openings in the sides that allow easy connections to the audio input, USB, and other ports. You can also remove and insert SD cards without opening the case.