Twighlight Takeoff

A nice twilight view of a takeoff from runway 32L at Boeing Field (KBFI) in Seattle. I was headed out to log night takeoffs and landings at Arlington, WA (KAWO), north of Seattle. Although runways 14 were in use, the tower offered an opposite-direction departure from runway 32L to speed my on my way.

As I depart, you can see a “string of pearls,” the lights of airliners inbound to land on runways 16 at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (KSEA).

Beautiful Day to Fly in Seattle

Here are some excerpts from an aerobatic flight with a German 747 captain who is also an active light aircraft pilot. We explored basic aerobatics on a beautiful late-summer day in Seattle.

An ILS at Night

Clear skies recently offered an opportunity to log a little night flying time and to practice an ILS at Boeing Field (KBFI). I can’t log the approach for IFR currency (I wasn’t under the hood and didn’t have a safety pilot), but it’s still good practice to fly approaches in VMC when possible to reinforce IFR procedures.

An RNAV Approach at Walla Walla

Here’s video of the RNAV (GPS) RWY 20 approach at Walla Walla, WA (KALW). Because my A36 Bonanza is equipped with WAAS-capable Garmin GTN 750, I can fly to the ILS-like LPV (localizer performance with vertical guidance) minimums. Given the choice between an ILS and an RNAV procedure with LPV minimums, I usually choose the RNAV approach. It’s easier to set up with no CDI switching required.

Aerobatics with Data

Here’s a look at an aerobatic ride with data from a Garmin VIRB Ultra 30 camera’s sensors overlaid. The GPS-based position, speed, and altitude don’t match the information from cockpit instruments precisely, and the sensors sometimes can’t keep up with the dynamics of aerobatics, but the data do give you an idea of how quickly things change during aerobatics. We also had a tailwind of about 6 knots during the landing, so the GPS-derived groundspeed is higher than the indicated airspeed during the approach and landing.

It’s also worth noting that during aerobatic rides I try to fly smoothly and keep the Gs under control. Rides aren’t aerobatic contests or airshows.

To display the data in a video, I first import the video and corresponding data into the free Garmin VIRB Edit program. After choosing the gauges to display, I export the video and do the final editing in Adobe Premiere Elements.

Aerobatic Ride on a Summer Morning

Flying the Extra: Seattle to Las Vegas

Each year around the end of September, I fly the Extra 300L from Boeing Field (KBFI) in Seattle to its winter base at Boulder City, NV (KBVU) outside Las Vegas. The video below shows highlights from the flight this year. Enjoy the dramatic changes in the landscape from the well-watered Puget Sound region to the desolate desert in southern Nevada.

BruceAir-Extra-009.jpgPhoto: Felix Knaack

The Extra isn’t designed for long-distance journeys, and I have to make two fuel stops to complete the journey of about 900 nm (1670 km). I usually stop at Bend, OR (KBDN) and Yerrington, NV (O43). The flight itself typically requires 5.5 – 6.0 hours; with the two stops the total block time is usually about 8 hours.

You can view the route that I flew at Skyvector.com here.