Accelerated (Turning) Stalls in a Bonanza

Many pilots are uncomfortable with stalls while the wings are banked, typically because they’re concerned that, at the stall, a wing will drop, and the airplane will depart into an incipient spin. In this video, I demonstrate stalls in an A36 Bonanza while banking at 45 and 30 degrees. As you can see, if the turn is coordinated, at the stall, the nose drops toward the horizon, but the bank angle remains essentially constant.

Because the airplane is turning, the stall occurs at an airspeed higher than it does in a straight-ahead, wings-level stall. An airplane in a level turn is accelerating (changing velocity because it’s changing direction), and therefore experiences more than 1G.

As the Airplane Flying Handbook notes:

The airplane will, however, stall at a higher indicated airspeed when excessive maneuvering loads are imposed by steep turns, pull-ups, or other abrupt changes in its flight path. Stalls entered from such flight situations are called “accelerated maneuver stalls,” a term, which has no reference to the airspeeds involved. (Chapter 4: “Slow Flight, Stalls, and Spins”)

In non-aerobatic aircraft like the Bonanza, we typically practice accelerated stalls while turning. As I explain, the first step in any stall recovery is reducing angle attack. After the wings are flying again, you can correct the bank and return normal flight.

To learn more about accelerated stalls, see other videos on my YouTube channel, including Accelerated Stalls from Steep Banks and Accelerated Stalls in the Vertical.

Accelerated Stalls in a Bonanza
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