New Practical Test Standards Emphasize Scenarios and ADM

The FAA has published new practical test standards (PTS) for the private pilot and commercial pilot certificates (the new standards become effective on 1 June 2012). As I noted in an earlier blog post, the rewritten criteria emphasize the use of scenarios instead of a series of individual tasks, and the examiner must evaluate “the applicant’s risk management in making safe aeronautical decisions.”

The FAA describes this important change in emphasis this way:

The examiner shall evaluate the applicant’s ability throughout the practical test to use good aeronautical decision-making procedures in order to evaluate risks. The examiner shall accomplish this requirement by developing a scenario that incorporates as many Tasks as possible to evaluate the applicant’s risk management in making safe aeronautical decisions. For example, the examiner may develop a scenario that incorporates weather decisions and performance planning.

The applicant’s ability to utilize all the assets available in making a risk analysis to determine the safest course of action is essential for satisfactory performance. The scenario should be realistic and within the capabilities of the aircraft used for the practical test.

Single-Pilot Resource Management (SRM) is defined as the art and science of managing all the resources (both onboard the aircraft and from outside sources) available to a single-pilot (prior and during flight) to ensure that the successful outcome of the flight is never in doubt. SRM available resources can include human resources, hardware, and information. Human resources “…includes all other groups routinely working with the pilot who are involved in decisions that are required to operate a flight safely. These groups include, but are not limited to: dispatchers, weather briefers, maintenance personnel, and air traffic controllers.” SRM is a set of skill competencies that must be evident in all Tasks in this practical test standard as applied to single-pilot operation. (FAA-S-8081-14B, pp. 12-13)

The emphasis on scenario-based training and aeronautical decision making complements the underlying themes of my new book, Scenario-Based Training with X-Plane and Microsoft Flight Simulator: Using PC-Based Flight Simulations based on FAA and Industry Training Standards. Even if you don’t use a PC-based simulation, you may find background information about SBT, FITS, and ADM helpful; the scenarios (30 for the private pilot syllabus, plus 18 in the IFR syllabus) may help you understand the key concepts and develop your own training challenges.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: