Three Views of a Barrel Roll

This short video shows you a barrel roll from several perspectives. First, you watch it as I cut between different cameras; next watch the entire maneuver from the wingtip perspective; finally, you see the complete roll from my perspective in the rear seat of the Extra 300L.

As I explain in the video, this barrel roll is not the textbook maneuver. Typically, you start a barrel roll by offsetting the nose 45 degrees left or right of a reference. Then you pull up and roll around that reference point.

I use this modified barrel roll (which is similar to those flown by formation teams such as the Blue Angels, Thunderbirds, and Snowbirds) with students to help them become accustomed to all-attitude flying, develop awareness of how 3-4G feels, and to fly the airplane throughout its speed range. Because it’s a slow, graceful maneuver, students have lots of time to watch the roll develop, and it’s a smooth, coordinated maneuver throughout.

More videos on my YouTube channel, BruceAirFlying.

Vertical Roll and Hammerhead

A short clip of a vertical roll to a hammerhead, followed by a roll on the vertical down line. It was a lovely day to fly in the Pacific Northwest. For more videos, visit my YouTube channel, BruceAirFlying.

Pictures from an Aerobatic Ride

It was a lovely day to fly in the Pacific Northwest. I gave an aerobatic ride in the Extra 300L. Here’s a link to a gallery of images captured from the video.

You can find videos of aerobatic flights on my YouTube channel, BruceAirFlying.

Wing-Vdown-001

Video Highlights from an Aerobatic Ride

I had an enthusiastic passenger for an aerobatic ride in the Extra 300L the other day. Here are video highlights from the flight. More videos at my YouTube channel, BruceAirFlying

American Futures: Visiting America by Small Plane

James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic and an IFR-rated pilot (currently of a Cirrus), has been flying around the U.S. and writing about the experience of visiting cities and towns that are reinventing themselves (more details and stories at American Futures). You can view an album of photos taken along the way here.

He and his wife Deb were featured in a program on C-SPAN last week, talking about their experience so far.

A New Way to Open and Close VFR Flight Plans

I recently ferried a C182 from Boulder City, NV to Boulder, CO (route at SkyVector here).

This a was VFR trip with the airplane’s new owner (who hadn’t flown in more than 30 years–talk about getting back into flying), and, based on previous experience flying the route, I knew that for much of the trip we’d be in poor radar/communications coverage at 9500 MSL. It was a good opportunity to try the new EasyActivate and EasyClose features available via Lockheed Martin Flight Services (video below).

Now, I know the arguments about the value of filing VFR flight plans, and like many pilots, I rarely file VFR flight plans. Contacting FSS to open a VFR flight plan, especially when departing busy airspace, can be cumbersome, and even with cell phones, calling FSS at the other end and navigating the prompts/menus to close a flight plan with a briefer can also be pain.

But on long trips like this one, across sparsely populated areas and in a new airplane, I like having backup for SAR. For that purpose, I filed a detailed route (see above) and stuck to it. (I did pick up flight following on the leg from KAEG–necessary to get through the ABQ Class C and to deal efficiently with the airspace around Denver.)

This new feature is handy. File your VFR flight plan directly with L-M (not DUAT or DUATS) and select the appropriate options. About 30 minutes before your ETD, you’ll get an email or text message with a link to open the flight plan. When you’re ready to go, click/tap the link. You’ll receive a confirmation.

About 30 minutes before your ETA, you’ll get another message from L-M with a link to close the flight plan. After you land, click/tap the link, and almost immediately you’ll receive a confirmation.

No menus. No waiting to talk to a briefer over a scratchy connection. And with the reminders, less risk of forgetting to close a VFR flight plan.

Given that many of my flights involve trips into the wide open spaces of the West, often in airplanes that either aren’t equipped or suitable for IFR, I’m going to take advantage of this new way to use VFR flight plans.

Accelerated Spin Demonstrations

It’s important to use the correct sequence of control inputs when recovering from a developed spin. Absent specific guidance from the aircraft manufacturer in the aircraft flight manual (also known as the POH), the PARE technique taught by Rich Stowell is a proven sequence.

PARE:

  • Power—idle
  • Ailerons—neutral
  • Rudder–full opposite direction of spin
  • Elevator–forward to reduce angle of attack and break the stall.

This video shows what typically happens if you push forward on the stick or yoke before you apply rudder. The spin accelerates. That rapid, changing rotation can disorient the pilot and delay recovery.

To learn more about stalls and spins, visit my website.

Accelerated Spins

To see more stall/spin videos, visit my Stalls and Spins playlist on my YouTube, channel, BruceAirFlying.

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